Portuguese Power: Table Wines Gaining American Adoration

The land of rooster and port is seeing a welcomed surge in popularity among American wine consumers, according to Impact Databank’s yearly wine and spirits report. Reports are that Portugal saw a 21 percent jump in table wine exports to the United States in the first half of 2014 – more than 700,000 cases have been shipped. The significant spike is an encouraging sign, particularly in light of a seven percent increase in exported cases this past year. 

 

Portuguese industry experts point out wines under $15 are the most popular with American drinkers, but that there’s a growing interest in Portuguese wines between $15 and  $20.

 

Table wines aren’t the only winners in the Portugal wine industry. The United States has also developed a taste for vinho verde, a young wine consumed within a year of bottling and include a light sparkle resulting from in-the-bottle malolactic fermentation. In the past five years, exports of vinho verde to the United States have grown 43 percent to 484,000 cases. 
Though Americans’ interest in Portuguese wines is rising at a rapid rate, their consumption is a fraction of other nations.

 

According to Wines of Portugal’s report of the industry’s 2013 export statistics, seven countries import more Portuguese wines than the United States. Angola led the way with a little more than 650,000 hectoliters. France imported more than 500,000 hectoliters. 

 

A steep dropoff follows the French. The United Kingdom and Germany imported around 200,000 hectoliters, while Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium and the United States hovering around 150,000 imported hectoliters.

 

Overall, Portugal’s table wine is the global favorite. More than 1,400,000 hectoliters of table wine was exported in 2013, followed by nearly 400,000  hectoliters of D.O.P. Wine and more than 360,000 liters of I.G.P. Wine. 

 

Hat Tip To: Snooth – Articles

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